by ctophermac:
1/5
I’m thrilled to share a series of posters I illustrated for Strand Book Store in New York celebrating Banned Books Week (Sept. 22nd-28th)! I’ll be posting one of these illustrations every day this week just to remind you that banned books are the best books.
Thanks to art director Lisa Jee!

by ctophermac:

1/5

I’m thrilled to share a series of posters I illustrated for Strand Book Store in New York celebrating Banned Books Week (Sept. 22nd-28th)! I’ll be posting one of these illustrations every day this week just to remind you that banned books are the best books.

Thanks to art director Lisa Jee!

(via bookporn)

"Publishers are like, ‘We don’t know who your market is, we don’t know who we’d sell your book to,’ and I’m like, ‘What do you mean? Like… People with reading skills?’"
- Roxane Gay, talking about writers of color at the “This Woman’s Work” panel at the 2014 Brooklyn Book Festival (via yeahwriters)

(via weneeddiversebooks)

"And men go abroad to admire the heights of mountains, the mighty waves of the sea, the broad tides of rivers, the compass of the ocean, and the circuits of the stars, yet pass over the mystery of themselves without a thought."
- Augustine of Hippo, Confessions  (via listentothestories)

(Source: quotes-shape-us, via listentothestories)

Anonymous asked:

Ms. Bardugo, I loved your first books, but I was terribly disappointed to see you give in to political correctness in Ruin & Rising. You had a great story and then you ruined it with unnecessary lesbianism. Authors don't need to make statements, they just need to write good books. I hope you'll remember that in the future.

Confessions of a Library Dandy. Answer:

lbardugo:

I was really tempted to ignore this because I don’t believe in giving anon wangs a platform, but the term “unnecessary lesbianism” made me laugh so hard that I caved.

Authors can write good books and make statements. I’m going to make some statements now. (Get ready.)

Queer people and queer relationships aren’t less necessary to narrative than cishet people or relationships. In fact, given the lovely emails and messages I’ve received about Tamar and Nadia (and given the existence of anon wangs like you), I’d say making queer relationships visible in young adult fiction is an excellent—and yes, necessary—idea.

I do agree that story trumps statement or we’d all just write angry pamphlets, but queer people exist both in my world and the world of the Grisha trilogy. I don’t see how including them in my work is making a statement unless that statement is “I won’t willfully ignore or exclude people in order to make a few anon wangs happy.” If that’s the statement I’m making, I’m totally down with it.

Also, I’m going to take this moment to shout out Malinda Lo, Laura Lam, Alex London, David Levithan, Emily Danforth, Emma Trevayne, Sarah Rees Brennan, Maureen Johnson, and Cassandra Clare, and to link to Malinda’s 2013 guide to LGBT in YA.  Because why just give attention to bigots when you can talk about awesome books and authors instead?

LOVE HER! 

weneeddiversebooks queer books authors