"And men go abroad to admire the heights of mountains, the mighty waves of the sea, the broad tides of rivers, the compass of the ocean, and the circuits of the stars, yet pass over the mystery of themselves without a thought."
- Augustine of Hippo, Confessions  (via listentothestories)

(Source: quotes-shape-us, via listentothestories)

Anonymous asked:

Ms. Bardugo, I loved your first books, but I was terribly disappointed to see you give in to political correctness in Ruin & Rising. You had a great story and then you ruined it with unnecessary lesbianism. Authors don't need to make statements, they just need to write good books. I hope you'll remember that in the future.

Confessions of a Library Dandy. Answer:

lbardugo:

I was really tempted to ignore this because I don’t believe in giving anon wangs a platform, but the term “unnecessary lesbianism” made me laugh so hard that I caved.

Authors can write good books and make statements. I’m going to make some statements now. (Get ready.)

Queer people and queer relationships aren’t less necessary to narrative than cishet people or relationships. In fact, given the lovely emails and messages I’ve received about Tamar and Nadia (and given the existence of anon wangs like you), I’d say making queer relationships visible in young adult fiction is an excellent—and yes, necessary—idea.

I do agree that story trumps statement or we’d all just write angry pamphlets, but queer people exist both in my world and the world of the Grisha trilogy. I don’t see how including them in my work is making a statement unless that statement is “I won’t willfully ignore or exclude people in order to make a few anon wangs happy.” If that’s the statement I’m making, I’m totally down with it.

Also, I’m going to take this moment to shout out Malinda Lo, Laura Lam, Alex London, David Levithan, Emily Danforth, Emma Trevayne, Sarah Rees Brennan, Maureen Johnson, and Cassandra Clare, and to link to Malinda’s 2013 guide to LGBT in YA.  Because why just give attention to bigots when you can talk about awesome books and authors instead?

LOVE HER! 

weneeddiversebooks queer books authors

What great work by librarians. :)

hope-in-every-book:

svyalitchat:

The #SVYALit Project: Using YA Lit to talk about sexual violence and consent in the lives of teens. Here are a few book lists and book reviews.

Because No Always Mean No, a list of books dealing with sexual assault  
Take 5: Difficult books on an important topic (sexual violence)
Take 5: Sexual Violence in the Life of Boys  
Book Review: The Gospel of Winter by Brendan Kiely 
Thinking About Boys, Sex, and Sex & Violence by Carrie Mesrobian 
What Happens Next by Colleen Clayton 
Plus One by Elizabeth Fama
September Girls by Bennett Madison  
Discussing THE S WORD by Chelsea Pitcher, a guest post by Lourdes Keochgerien
5 Reasons I Loved Faking Normal by Courtney C. Stevens
Charm and Strange by Stephanie Khuen
The Truth About Alice by Jennifer Mathieu
The Winner’s Curse by Marie Rutkoski
Uses for Boys by Erica Loraine Scheidt
Killer Instinct by S. E. Green

Live Through This by Mindi Scott

Sex/Consent Positive Titles: Karen’s List Christa’s List Carrie’s List

See the complete #SVYALit Project Index Here: http://www.teenlibrariantoolbox.com/2014/02/svyalit-project-index.html

This is important. Could very well help those struggling to read these books. Don’t leave anyone in the dark.

(via thecommonlibrarian)

"I often hear people say that they read to escape reality, but I believe that what they’re really doing is reading to find reason for hope, to find strength. While a bad book leaves readers with a sense of hopelessness and despair, a good novel, through stories of values realized, of wrongs righted, can bring to readers a connection to the wonder of life. A good novel shows how life can and ought to be lived. It not only entertains but energizes and uplifts readers."
- Terry Goodkind (via bookporn)